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A guide to garden chandeliers

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A guide to garden chandeliers

Chandeliers are classy and elegant, so why must they be limited to staying inside? Adding one to your outdoor space can bring glamour and interest, making it a welcoming part of your home. Of course, the daintiest of chandeliers might not be at home in the great outdoors, so there are a few guidelines to consider when choosing one for your outdoor living space.

Decorative and lighting options

A chandelier doesn’t have to light up in order for it to shine. Just picturing a chandelier in your mind brings images of exquisitely cut crystals hanging in air. However, options like those are normally best kept indoors where they can’t be scratched in any way. Plus, those can be quite expensive. Fortunately, there are plastic options that mimic the same way glass crystals shimmer while saving you a buck. Those who are crafty may enjoy creating their own little chandelier to hang in their garden using plastic embellishments and beads.

If you’re looking to add some light to your outdoor space, a larger chandelier equipped with outdoor lights can be just the thing. Make sure you check the tag for “UL listed for use in damp conditions.” That will allow you to keep your chandelier outside year round. Otherwise, you can always use solar powered lights or LED lights. Solar lights are good for those who are on a budget and don’t want to do any wiring. Unless you plan on running an extension cord, you will need to hire an electrician to install your chandelier. Of course, if you really want to go low-tech, candles are always a good option for setting the mood.

Style and material

The best kind of garden chandelier is made from wrought iron. Any kind of metal will stand up to the changing weather in an outdoor living space. The style you choose should echo your current outdoor space including furniture and plants. Though metal is most common, there are some chandeliers made of wood. The creative type may find inspiration in branches or even antlers to craft a one-of-a-kind outdoor chandelier. One online project even entails repurposing an old hula-hoop and icicle lights for an enchanting chandelier. Many home and garden stores will have already made chandeliers for use in an outdoor space. But, it helps to consider these creative options, as well as vintage chandeliers you may find at a thrift store. Use your imagination to create an ideal outdoor living space.

Uses

A garden chandelier can be used in a number of areas outdoors. The most common is on a covered deck or porch. For those using a chandelier as a lighting option, it is best to have a solid structure to hold up your fixture. Some homeowners may have a dining tent secured to their deck and that is a great place to add in some light. A chandelier made of hanging mason jars can light up some lively conversation at a summertime barbecue. The same goes for those with gazebos. Of course, a simple chandelier can alight a quiet getaway area in your garden by hanging from a tree-branch. Small, light chandeliers can be hung from planted hooks in the garden for interest. A feature like that would even be appropriate for an outdoor wedding.

An elegant garden chandelier can add to the atmosphere of any outdoor space, be it a garden, gazebo or deck. Take these factors into account when choosing one for your home.

Check out these examples for some ideas.

Hula-hoop chandelier

http://sarahontheblog.blogspot.com.au/2012/04/hula-hoop-chandelier.html

Mason jar and other DIY chandeliers

http://www.theartofupcycling.com/2013/09/diy-chandeliers-upcycling-ideas-to.html

Pinterest board for garden chandeliers

http://www.pinterest.com/marykake47/garden-chandeliers/

Wrought iron chandelier

http://www.arusticgarden.com/24wrircach.html

Pinterest board for solar light chandeliers

http://www.pinterest.com/explore/solar-light-chandelier/

Wedding chandelier

http://fashionbride.wordpress.com/2013/04/28/flower-power-booking-your-florist-last/wedding-chandeliers-outdoor-garden-crystal-3/

By Meagan Dieroff

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